Gorilla Marketing [...]

Branding can become so methodical. Sometimes what is needed is earning trust and letting others carry the message.

What actually works in a noisy environment isn't more noise—it's the challenging work of earning the benefit of people telling people.We don't need more hustle. We need more care and generosity. (Source)

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Leadership Spectrum [...]

Susan Cain talks about leadership as a spectrum where we often favour one end. Grant Lichtman summarises this as follows:

At one end of the spectrum, leaders direct, prod, or rule over others. They are first among non-equals. Leadership in this construct is about power and position.  This is not a value statement, but a statement of fact. Human organizations often need this kind of leadership lest they devolve into randomness or chaos.

At the other end of the spectrum, and perhaps the end that has been ignored because it is more subtle, harder to find, or easier to overlook, is the person who leads from a place of humility, or the shadows, from the bench, or out of some deep creative passion.  At this end we find those who do not seek a position of leadership, but rather a path of leadership. We find the moral leader (Ghandi); the explorer (Earhart); the knowledge leader (Einstein); the servant leader (Pope Francis), the inventive leader (Musk).source

The problem with this is that we forget about the leadership associated with being a follower.

How is your school rewarding the servant-leader, the quiet leader, the non-titled leader, the student or teacher who makes those around them rise through the power of ideas and actions outside the spotlight?  How is your college or university digging deeper into those admissions applications to widen what has traditionally been a narrow view of “leadership”?source

Treating the Moment As It Is [...]

Reflecting on playing with Miles Davis, Herbie Hancock described a time when he played the wrong chord, but Miles simply responded to the situation to make it right. Hancock uses this situation to emphasise responding to the moment in order to grown and develop:

https://youtu.be/FL4LxrN-iyw?t=5m3s (Source)

The Scent of Knowledge [...]

Alan Kay gave the following advice to Bret Victor once:

I think the trick with knowledge is to "acquire it, and forget all except the perfume" -- because it is noisy and sometimes drowns out one's own "brain voices". The perfume part is important because it will help find the knowledge again to help get to the destinations the inner urges pick. (Source)

It would seem that the challenge with knowledge is holding on just tight enough that if you need to grip harder, you can, but if you need to change hand grips, you can also do that as well.

Distrusting Technology [...]

Bret Victor talks about being open to new ways of doing things. A part of this is having a healthy level of distrust:

Learn tools, and use tools, but don't accept tools. Always distrust them; always be alert for alternative ways of thinking. This is what I mean by avoiding the conviction that you "know what you're doing" (Source)

This in part relates to working at the margins.

Recoding the Internet of Things [...]

Murray Goulden discusses some of the ways that technology and the internet of things is trying to recode our lives

These technologies are, largely unwittingly, attempting to recode some of the most basic patterns of our everyday lives, namely how we live alongside those we are most intimate with. As such, their placement in our homes as consumer products constitute a vast social experiment. If the experience of using them is too challenging to our existing orderings, the likelihood is we will simply come to reject them.source

This in part touches on many of the points made in The Circle.

Writing a Newsletter [...]

Different to a blog, newsletters usually bring with them a certain regularity. In the wake of 100 newsletters, Ian O'Byrne shares some lessons learned from writing a newsletter.

If you have started writing and publishing your own newsletter, my advice is to start writing, and don’t stop publishing. In just the same way that my blogging voice has developed and changed over time…so too has my work with the newsletter. I believe that you do not really find out what you want to write until you start writing. Allow for it to blossom and change. source

It is interesting to compare writing a newsletter with a blog. There is a deliberate practice associated with it. With this comes a continuous endeavour to refine the process.

Curiosity [...]

So often curiousity is seen as the cure for all life's ills. The problem as Dean Shareski highlights, is that life does not always support curiousity:

The problem with curiosity is, it’s nice in theory, it might work in schools, but in the real world, curiosity is not valued and it’s often disdained.http://ideasandthoughts.org/2017/05/29/the-problem-with-curiosity/

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Digital Pedagogy [...]

Michael Fullan is often quoted as saying technology first, pedagogy second. Neil Selwyn poses a series of questions associated with notion of digital pedagogy:

What is actually new here?What are the unintended consequences or second-order effects?What are the potential gains? What are the potential losses?What underlying values and agendas are implicit?In whose interests does this work? Who benefits in what ways?What are the social problems that digital technology is being presented as a solution to?How responsive to a ‘digital fix’ are these problems likely to be? (Source)

One of the criticisms with this is that the digital is never neutral and often impacts on the pedagogical choices.

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