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Questions for Data [...]

Audrey Watters writes down a series of questions to consider when thinking about data:> Is this meaningful data? Are “test scores” or “grades” meaningful units of measurement, for example? What can we truly know based on this data? Are our measurements accurate? Is our analysis, based on the data that we’ve collected, accurate? What sorts of assumptions a...

 

Markets only care about the bits, not where they are from [...]

> The markets that are working the Internet out do not care if the bits on the network are from a school, a hospital, or you playing an online game and watching videos–it just wants to meter and throttle them. It may care just enough to understand where it can possible charge more because it is a matter of life or death, or it is your child’s education, so you are...

 

Loose Parts and Space [...]

Learning environments involve so many variables. One of which is the feeling associated with such space, another is the . Countering the desks and rows, the theory of **loose parts** discusses the importance of change in the environment. > In educational circles, there is a theory that helps explain the compulsion; it’s called the theory of loose parts. Originall...

 

Technological Freedams [...]

>Freedom to run software that I’ve paid for on any device I want without hardware dongles or persistent online verification schemes. >Freedom from the prying eyes of government and corporations. >Freedom to move my data from one application to another. >Freedom to move an application from one hosting provider to another. >Freedom from contracts that lock me in to ex...

 

PYP [...]

“Being a PYP teacher… a good PYP teacher, demands that you put in the thought, that you deliberate over purpose and meaning – either alone or with your colleagues – and that you continuously reflect on what you and your students are doing" https://timespaceeducation.wordpress.com/2017/06/27/semantics-is-not-a-bad-word/...

 

Organic Intellectual [...]

A description of Gramsci's notion of the **organic intellectual** from David Sessions: > Gramsci’s conception of the *organic intellectual* was not merely meant to describe the prophets of the European bourgeoisie and its industrial capitalism. The organic intellectual was above all a concept for the left: a name for those who, emerging from working-class condition...

 

Thought Leader vs. Public Intellectual [...]

Unlike the public intellectual, whose position is built over time, the thought leader breaks through and disrupts with a single minded focus. As David Sessions explains: > The true role of the thought leader is to serve as the organic intellectual of the one percent—the figure who, as Gramsci put it, gives the emerging class “an awareness of its own function” i...

 

CivicTech [...]

We talk about digital citizenship, but taking this a step further, is the idea of CivicTech. > Grodeska uses the term “CivicTech” and I think there is a fair amount of overlap between “Civic Imagination” (the idea of imagining a better future and then taking steps to make it happen) and “CivicTech” (which is the idea of making sure we use digital tools wis...

 

Always Already Interpellated [...]

French Marxist Louis Althusser argued in his paper *Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses* that there is no beyond or outside within which we can exist. Instead, we are **always already interpellated**, called into existence. > Thus ideology hails or interpellates individuals as subjects. As ideology is eternal, I must now suppress the temporal form in which I h...

 

Code as a Speciman [...]

It is often stated that code is the new literacy of the 21st century. One of the problems with this is that code and is not the same as literature. As Peter Seibel describes: >Code is not literature. We don’t read code, we decode it. We examine it. A piece of code is not literature; it is a specimenSource It is interesting to considering this in lieu of Doug Belsh...