Power of Stories [...]

Discussing the *social age*, Julian Stodd uppacks the power of stories. For him, the question often relates to whom owns the story and how it flows. > Stories are the mechanism of transmission of cultural and tacit knowledge: they are units of information, heavily contextualised, highly magnetic, almost frictionless, and can be very, very, long lived. If i tell a sto...

 

Silicon Valley Seasteads [...]

American libertarian activist Patri Friedman thinks that the future of the city-state are 'seasteads': > Patri is taking the Silicon Valley mindset and applying it to the nation-state. There are all these things you could now do that didn’t exist when our current system of government was invented, he told me. Constant online direct-democracy voting, building smart-c...

 

The Myth of the Nation-State [...]

In his reflections on the city-state, Jamie Barlett explains that: > nation-states are nothing but agreed-upon myths: we give up certain freedoms in order to secure others. But if that transaction no longer works, and we stop agreeing on the myth, it ceases to have power over us. This is similar to the ideas of Benedict Anderson and the notion of . It is also intere...

 

Strategies for Gathering Student Data with more Care [...]

Amy Collier provides seven strategies for taking more care when working with data: > Audit student data repositories and policies associated with third-party providers. Document every "place" that student data goes and what the policies are for handling student data. What third parties have access to student data, why do they have access, and what can they do with th...

 

Decentralised Networks [...]

The web by its nature is decentralised, however platforms often try to centralise it. Paul Ford discusses the benefits of setting up your own server and the lessons one is able to learn through the process. > Then I look at Raspberry Pi Zeros with Wi-Fi built in and I keep thinking, what would it take to just have a little web server that was only for three or four ...

 

Participation within Assemblages [...]

Ian Guest reflects on the nature of participation from the perspective of their place within an assemblage: > What about the epistemological contribution of the nonhumans I wondered? Leaving aside the potentially emotive discussion of animals in research for a moment, I’m not going to claim that nonhumans should be part of our ethical discussions; they’re not lik...

 

Learning Walks [...]

AITSL defines a *learning walks* as: > A group of teachers visiting multiple classrooms at their own school with the aim of fostering conversation about teaching and learning in order to develop a shared vision of high quality teaching that impacts on student learning> For Lyn Sharrett, learning walks offer a means of leaders collecting data that can then be used in c...

 

Markets only care about the bits, not where they are from [...]

> The markets that are working the Internet out do not care if the bits on the network are from a school, a hospital, or you playing an online game and watching videos–it just wants to meter and throttle them. It may care just enough to understand where it can possible charge more because it is a matter of life or death, or it is your child’s education, so you are...

 

Technological Freedoms [...]

>Freedom to run software that I’ve paid for on any device I want without hardware dongles or persistent online verification schemes. >Freedom from the prying eyes of government and corporations. >Freedom to move my data from one application to another. >Freedom to move an application from one hosting provider to another. >Freedom from contracts that lock me in to ex...

 

Questions for Data [...]

Audrey Watters writes down a series of questions to consider when thinking about data: > Is this meaningful data? Are “test scores” or “grades” meaningful units of measurement, for example? What can we truly know based on this data? Are our measurements accurate? Is our analysis, based on the data that we’ve collected, accurate? What sorts of assumptions are...