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Questions for Data [...]

Audrey Watters writes down a series of questions to consider when thinking about data: > Is this meaningful data? Are “test scores” or “grades” meaningful units of measurement, for example? What can we truly know based on this data? Are our measurements accurate? Is our analysis, based on the data that we’ve collected, accurate? What sorts of assumptions are...

 

Strategies for Gathering Student Data with more Care [...]

Amy Collier provides seven strategies for taking more care when working with data: > Audit student data repositories and policies associated with third-party providers. Document every "place" that student data goes and what the policies are for handling student data. What third parties have access to student data, why do they have access, and what can they do with th...

 

Decentralised Networks [...]

The web by its nature is decentralised, however platforms often try to centralise it. Paul Ford discusses the benefits of setting up your own server and the lessons one is able to learn through the process. > Then I look at Raspberry Pi Zeros with Wi-Fi built in and I keep thinking, what would it take to just have a little web server that was only for three or four ...

 

Participation within Assemblages [...]

Ian Guest reflects on the nature of participation from the perspective of their place within an assemblage: > What about the epistemological contribution of the nonhumans I wondered? Leaving aside the potentially emotive discussion of animals in research for a moment, I’m not going to claim that nonhumans should be part of our ethical discussions; they’re not lik...

 

Open Office Stress [...]

The claim is made that open offices were designed as a part of the *third industrial revolution* where skilled people could come together and collaborate. Reports since the 70's have discovered that this is not the case and that such spaces increase stress and reduce productivity. >Another design-based example is open-plan offices. In the push to lower overheads—...

 

Technological Freedoms [...]

>Freedom to run software that I’ve paid for on any device I want without hardware dongles or persistent online verification schemes. >Freedom from the prying eyes of government and corporations. >Freedom to move my data from one application to another. >Freedom to move an application from one hosting provider to another. >Freedom from contracts that lock me in to ex...

 

Learning Walks [...]

AITSL defines a *learning walks* as: > A group of teachers visiting multiple classrooms at their own school with the aim of fostering conversation about teaching and learning in order to develop a shared vision of high quality teaching that impacts on student learning> For Lyn Sharrett, learning walks offer a means of leaders collecting data that can then be used in c...

 

Markets only care about the bits, not where they are from [...]

> The markets that are working the Internet out do not care if the bits on the network are from a school, a hospital, or you playing an online game and watching videos–it just wants to meter and throttle them. It may care just enough to understand where it can possible charge more because it is a matter of life or death, or it is your child’s education, so you are...

 

Loose Parts and Space [...]

Learning environments involve so many variables. One of which is the feeling associated with such space, another is the . Countering the desks and rows, the theory of **loose parts** discusses the importance of change in the environment. > In educational circles, there is a theory that helps explain the compulsion; it’s called the theory of loose parts. Originall...

 

PYP [...]

“Being a PYP teacher… a good PYP teacher, demands that you put in the thought, that you deliberate over purpose and meaning – either alone or with your colleagues – and that you continuously reflect on what you and your students are doing" https://timespaceeducation.wordpress.com/2017/06/27/semantics-is-not-a-bad-word/...