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Open Office Stress [...]

The claim is made that open offices were designed as a part of the *third industrial revolution* where skilled people could come together and collaborate. Reports since the 70's have discovered that this is not the case and that such spaces increase stress and reduce productivity. >Another design-based example is open-plan offices. In the push to lower overheads—and...

 

Collaboration Should Be Natural [...]

Gary Stager wonders about all the hype surrounding Google Docs and it's collaborative edge. In discussing his decades of experience, he suggests that writing is selfish and that collaboration should not be forced. Instead, he argues that for collaboration to work it needs to be natural. >Cooperation and collaboration are natural processes. Such skills are useful when ...

 

Collective Network [...]

Andrea Stringer discusses the voices of teachers within education, the power of coaching to develop expertise and the overall potential for collective efficacy. Aspects such as social media provide a way of supporting this. >For expertise in the classroom and in leadership, colleagues, my professional learning network, professional reading and discourse support me. I ...

 

Counter-surveillance [...]

Jim Groom reflects on the challenges of data surveillance for open education. The solution that he, and the team that he was collaborating with, came up with was that we need a form of *counter-surveillance* to take power and ownership back. >The only way to challenge surveillance is through counter-surveillance It is interesting to juxtapose this with a comment t...

 

Open as in Apertures  [...]

Alan Levine reflects on the recent discussions of **open** at OER17 and by Jim Groom. In response he adds a metaphor of his own, aperture, to represent the nuances associated with open and online identity. >Maybe we ought to think about openness as an aperture that is not just fixed at one size, but continually adjusts, as Kate suggests, with appreciation opportuni...

 

Teamwork in a Technological Age [...]

>Teamwork does not mean constant input from all members or the abuse of productivity and communication tools. Rather, is the collaborative effort that makes complex projects possible after individuals have effectively completed their own part. Teamwork done right requires as much (if not more) individual work, concise feedback, and understanding of the broader purpose...

 

Owning the Learning [...]

Scott Millman reflects on the nature of ownership in regards to learning and education. >what does owning your own learning actually mean? That your assignment is submitted on time? That you decide when the assignment is due? That eventually you don’t need a teacher to learn anything? That you only need five more behaviour points to win a prize? Or that it’s al...

 

Writing and the Listening Process [...]

In this article from **The Book of Life** an example of how the editor acts as a listener. The specific example provided is of the relationship between Raymond Carver and his editor, Gordan Lish. > Lish heavily edited Carver – or, as we might put it, listened to him in a hugely creative and transformative way; a way that can teach us about the art of listening in ...

 

Understanding through Listening [...]

Investigating *self* and *character*, **The Book of Life** explore the power of listening. Challenging the concept of understanding through speaking, the suggestion is that understanding and clarification comes through listening. > Generally we tend to believe that Self-Clarification will only be possible if we ourselves actually talk. But something far more interes...

 

Naming, Building, Breaking and Knowing the Web [...]

Martha Burtis summarises her thinking around Domain of One's Own. She splits the discussion into naming, building, breaking and knowing the different things on the web. > For WordPress can serve as an exemplar, a symbol with which our students can grapple as a way towards deeper understanding. The things they learn to do in WordPress are generalizable to other systems...